Reports

Pantry Practices in Rural South-Central & Southeast Alaska (2015) – Coming Soon!

This report shares findings from a study conducted in 2013, and looks at pantry practices from the client perspective. In this report we will examine pantry distribution schedules, the use of client choice, the use of proxy pick-ups, and the overall sense of welcome and generosity that a pantry conveys.

It is important to note that these practices are not intended to be prescriptive, or “best practice” recommendations. Rather, we hope that these findings will prompt discussion about possibilities and intentional choices among our pantry partners and the anti-hunger network.

Hunger in America Executive Summary (2014) – Coming Soon!

Coming Soon! Hunger in America is a series of quadrennial studies that provide comprehensive demographic profiles of people seeking food assistance through the charitable sector and an in-depth analysis of the partner agencies in the Feeding America network that provide this assistance. It is the largest study of its kind. The Alaska Food Coalition and the Food Bank of Alaska coordinate the Alaska portion of the study. The data collected through the Hunger in America studies help guide the development of programs and solutions that improve food security for individuals and their households and inform public policy and support for solving hunger at the local, state and national levels.

The-Importance-of-Local-Foods-in-Mitigating-Poverty--Related-Food-Insecurity-Report-(2013)-The Importance of Local Foods in Mitigating Poverty- Related Food Insecurity Report (2013) 

This report details a study conducted in the spring and summer of 2013 with rural users of the Alaskan charitable food system. We interviewed people who use food pantries about what they eat, what they would like to eat if they could, and how they think about acquiring food for their families. We asked questions such as: To what extent do they participate in subsistence or local agriculture? At what point do they turn to formal assistance such as the pantry, and what are the social meanings associated with doing so? How do they juggle the costs of food and other costs of daily living? These questions are important because within the usual discourses of food security, “market foods” (what can be purchased at the store) are often seen as less desirable than local foods, whether subsistence or agricultural. However, market foods are a mainstay of the US charitable food system (pantries, soup kitchens, etc.); thus these foods are still important for the people who use those services. In our efforts to improve the amount and quality of local foods, we must insure genuine access to those who are already the most vulnerable.


The-Case-for-Increased-Funding-for-Senior-Nutrition-Services-in-Alaska-(2011)The Case for Increased Funding for Senior Nutrition Services in Alaska
(2011)

Alaska’s growing senior population presents both a challenge and an opportunity. The senior population in Alaska is estimated to grow to over 100,000 by the year 2025, one eighth of the estimated total population of Alaska. Programs outlined under the Older Americans Act, such as home delivery services and congregate feeding sites, are important resources for many seniors. This report advocates for continued support for senior nutrition services, which will help our elders stay healthy and independent.

 

Hunger-in-America-(2010)Hunger in America (2010)

Hunger in America is a series of quadrennial studies that provide comprehensive demographic profiles of people seeking food assistance through the charitable sector and an in-depth analysis of the partner agencies in the Feeding America network that provide this assistance. It is the largest study of its kind. The Alaska Food Coalition and the Food Bank of Alaska coordinate the Alaska portion of the study. The data collected through the Hunger in America studies help guide the development of programs and solutions that improve food security for individuals and their households and inform public policy and support for solving hunger at the local, state and national levels.

 

Hungriest-Communities-Report-2009Hungriest Communities Report (2009)

In 2007, the USDA reports that 29,400 households in Alaska experience hunger, but it doesn’t tell us where they are and why they are hungry. Has the cost of food exceeded their budget? Does their community have access to federal nutrition programs, which the USDA study states helps feed more than half of food insecure households? Is the anti-hunger network reaching the community to provide food? In hopes of finding answers to these questions, the Alaska Food Coalition put together this report, which compiles data from several sources and categorizes communities based on their supply of food resources and the demand for those resources by community members.

 

25th-Legislature-Potential-Issues-to-Impact-Anti-Hunger-Network--200825th Legislature Potential Issues to Impact Anti-Hunger Network (2008)

The 25th Legislature addressed several issues that have the potential to impact the anti-hunger network and those people who are dependent on it. Read about the session and the pertinent bills, their impact to the network, their current status and what the Alaska Food Coalition needs to do to make sure we stay informed of legislative issues in the future.

 

 

25th-Legislature-Potential-Issues-to-Impact-Anti-Hunger-Network--2008An Impact Study of AFC Mini-Grants (2008)

Alaska Food Coalition mini-grants have been used by agencies to facilitate increases in food distribution and/or the types of food available to their clients. This report analyzes the impact the Alaska Food Coalition mini-grants have had on modernizing the physical capacity of grantee agencies as well as their effectiveness in providing small boosts in the amount and variety of food distributed. It also discusses the impact the Rasmuson Foundation grant had on the program during the FY08 grant cycle.

 

Results-from-the-2006-Alaska-BRFSS-Survey-Concerning-the-Hunger-Issue-2007Results from the 2006 Alaska BRFSS Survey Concerning the Hunger Issue (2007)

Results from the 2006 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) survey allow a more granular analysis of the growing hunger problem in Alaska than has ever been previously available. The results provide the numbers to prove many of the suspicions long held about hunger in Alaska – that there is an unacceptable lack of protection for the most vulnerable people in our state.

 

 


An Update on Bills and Resolutions Relevant to the Hunger Issue 2007An Update on Bills and Resolutions Relevant to the Hunger Issue
(2007)

The 25th session of the Alaska state legislature has seen two issues dominate the social services landscape in Alaska. The first concerns the eligibility criteria of Denali Kid Care and the second relates to the future funding structure of the Human Services Matching Grant. Read the latest on these issues and how they affect the anti-hunger community.

 

 

An-Impact-Study-of-the-Alaska-Food-Coalition-Mini-grants-2007An Impact Study of the Alaska Food Coalition Mini-grants (2007)

Alaska Food Coalition mini-grants have been used by agencies to facilitate increases in food distribution and/or the types of food available to their clients. This report analyzes the impact the Alaska Food Coalition mini-grants have had on modernizing the physical capacity of grantee agencies as well as their effectiveness in providing small boosts in the amount and variety of food distributed.

 

 

Capacity-building-Project-2007Capacity-building Project (2007) 

This presentation introduces analysis of the raw data produced by the Capacity-building Project. It outlines gaps in the service of Alaska’s charitable food network and makes recommendations for the increase in physical capacity of existing food programs.

 

 

 

A-Report-on-the-State-of-Alaskas-Boards-and-Commissions-2006A Report on the State of Alaska’s Boards and Commissions (2006) 

This report was prompted by the Executive Committee of The Alaska Food Coalition. The committee wanted to explore the possibilities of introducing the hunger issue to the system of Boards and Commissions in the State of Alaska. The report discovered that due to the specific focus of each existing board or commission and the wide-range of people affected by hunger, a separate Hunger Commission was the most desirable outcome.

 

 

A-Report-on-Bills-and-Resolutions-Relevant-to-the-Hunger-Issue-2006A Report on Bills and Resolutions Relevant to the Hunger Issue (2006) 

The work of the Alaska State Legislature is critical to the elimination of hunger in our state. The decisions made by legislators in Juneau directly affect the hungry and the anti-hunger network of Alaska. For that reason staff of anti-hunger agencies, advocates and clients of food assistance programs need to keep up with the legislation being discussed by elected officials. This report supplies the anti-hunger network with the information from the Twenty-Fourth Alaska State Legislature required to achieve this task.

 


A-Report-on-Bills-and-Resolutions-Relevant-to-the-Hunger-Issue-2006Physical Capacity Data of Charitable Anti-hunger Programs in Alaska
 (2006)

The report presents raw data on the physical capacity of Alaska’s charitable food providers as well as information on the communities they serve. The information was collected as part of the data gathering stage of the Capacity-building Project.

 

 

 

A-Report-on-Bills-and-Resolutions-Relevant-to-the-Hunger-Issue-2006AFC Capacity-building Research Project Overview (2005) 

This document sets out the purpose and methodology for the Capacity-building Project.

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